Additional information

Global Reporting Index

The following disclosure elements and indicators from the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) G3 Reporting Guidelines have been used in the preparation of this report. In this section, we provide a table comparing information on this report to the guidelines of the GRI, entitled 'Sustainability Reporting Guidelines 2006.'

 No.

Short Description / Title of Disclosure

 Notes

1

Strategy and Analysis

 

1.1

Statement from the most senior decision-maker of the organisation

 See Overview.

 2

Organisational Profile

 

2.1

Name of the organisation

University of New South Wales

2.2

Primary brands, products, and/or services

Education and Research

2.3

Operational structure

See UNSW organisational chart

2.4

Location of organisation’s headquarters.

Randwick, Sydney, NSW, Australia

2.5

Number and name of countries where the organisation operates

1

2.6

Nature of ownership and legal form

Body corporate under statute

2.7

Markets served

Main markets served are Australia, India, China, United States

2.8

Scale of the reporting organisation

See About UNSW

2.9

Significant changes

There were no significant operational changes in the past year

2.10

Awards received

See Appendix 3: Prizes

 3

Report Parameters

 

3.1

Reporting period

1 January 2013 to 31 December 2013

3.2

Date of most recent previous report

This is UNSW’s first sustainability report

3.3

Reporting cycle

Calendar year to be consistent with UNSW’s Financial Reporting period. It is UNSW's intention to produce an annual sustainability report.

3.4

Contact point

Aaron Magner, Director of UNSW Safety and Sustainability. a.magner@unsw.edu.au

3.5

Process for defining report content

See Overview

3.6

Boundary of the report

See Overview

3.7

State any specific limitations

None

3.8

Basis for reporting on joint ventures, subsidiaries, leased facilities, outsourced operations

The reporting boundary includes controlled entitites, subsidiaries, leased facilities, outsourced operations where these fall within UNSW's operational control. This report applies the definition for "operational control" in section 11 of the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Act 2007.

3.9

Data measurement techniques and the bases of calculations

See Overview

3.10

Explanation of the effect of any re-statements of information provided in earlier reports, and the reasons for such re-statement

Not applicable as this is UNSW’s first report

3.11

Significant changes from previous reporting periods

Not applicable as this is UNSW’s first report

3.12

Table identifying the location of the Standard Disclosures in the report.

See Appendix 1: GRI Table 

4

Governance

 

4.1

Governance structure

In accordance with the University of New South Wales Act 1989 (NSW), UNSW is governed by a Council of 15 members representing University and community interests.

4.2

Indicate whether the chair of the highest governance body is also an executive officer.

The Chancellor is the chair of the University Council, a non-executive position. The Vice-Chancellor is the Principal Executive Officer of the University and is responsible for the overall direction of corporate planning, budget activities and external relations. Under the University Council, the Vice-Chancellor manages and supervises the administrative, financial and other activities of the University.

4.3

For organisations that have a unitary board structure, state the number of members of the highest governance body

Of the 15 members of University Council, three are official members (the Vice-Chancellor, President of Academic Board and the Chancellor). Others include:

2 ministerial appointments

2 elected academic staff

2 council appointees

2 elected students (1 undergraduate, 1 post-graduate)

1 elected non-academic staff.

4.4

Mechanisms for shareholders and

employees to provide recommendations

or direction to the highest governance

body

There is a Student Representative Council with elected student leader office bearers that meet the Vice-Chancellor and Executive Team to raise issues on behalf of students on a regular basis. The Vice-Chancellor also holds regular town hall meetings where members of staff are able to ask questions. The University also recognises and meets with the trade unions including the NTEU, CPSU and United Voice, as employee representatives.

4.12

Externally developed economic, environmental, and social charters, principles to which the organisation subscribes/endorses

See Appendix 2: Declarations and charter 

4.14

List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organisation

Stakeholder groups the university engages with include students, staff, alumni, donors, government, local councils, suppliers, other universities, student organisations and staff unions.

4.15

Basis for identification and selection of stakeholders with whom to engage

See Overview

4.16

Approaches to stakeholder engagement

See Overview

EC

Economic

 

EC1

Direct economic value generated and distributed (Core)

The economic performance of the University is reported on in the UNSW Annual Report, available online here.

EC3

Coverage of the organisation’s defined

benefit plan obligations (Core)

No defined benefit super

EC4

Significant financial assistance received

from government (Core)

See UNSW Annual Report

EN

Environmental

 

EN2

Materials used that are recycled (Core)

See Environment, Purchasing

EN3

Direct energy consumption (Core)

See Environment, Energy

EN4

Indirect energy consumption (Core)

See Environment, Energy

EN8

Water withdrawal by source (Core)

See Environment, Water

EN16

Direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight (Core)

See Environment, Energy

EN18

Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reductions achieved (Additional)

See Environment, Energy

EN22

Waste by type and disposal method (Core)

See Environment, Waste

EN23

Significant spills (Core)

None

EN24

Waste deemed hazardous under the

terms of the Basel Convention 

(Additional)

None 

EN28

Significant fines and total number of

non-monetary sanctions (Core)

None

EN29

Significant environmental impacts of

transporting products (Additional)

None.

LA

Labour Practices

 

LA1

Total workforce (Core)

See Community, Equity and Diversity

LA4

Employees covered by collective bargaining agreements (Core)

UNSW Employees are covered by two enterprise agreements. The UNSW (Academic Staff) Enterprise Agreement 2015 and the UNSW (Professional Staff) Enterprise Agreement 2010. See UNSW Human Resources Enterprise Agreements.

LA7

Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days and absenteeism, and number of work related fatalities by region (Core)

See Community, Safety and Wellbeing

LA9

Health and safety topics covered informal agreements with trade unions (Additional)

The UNSW (Academic Staff) Enterprise Agreement 2011 and the UNSW (Professional Staff) Enterprise Agreement 2010 contains provisions relating to Occupational Health and Safety. See UNSW Human Resources Enterprise Agreements

LA13

Composition of governance bodies and employees according to gender, and other diversity indicators (Additional)

See Community, Equity and Diversity

HR

Human Rights

 

HR3

Employee training on human rights (Additional)

See UNSW Equity and Diversity statement

HR4

Incidents of discrimination (Core)

None

HR5

Operations identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at significant risk (Core)

None

HR6

Operations identified as having

significant risk for incidents of child 

labour (Core)

None

HR7

Operations identified as having

significant risk for incidents of forced or

compulsory labour (Core)

None

SO

Society

 

SO4

Actions taken in response to incidents of corruption (Core)

No incidents during reporting period

SO5

Public policy positions and participation in public policy development and lobbying (Core)

See UNSW Code of Conduct. See also Community, Research and UNSW Newsroom

SO8

Significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and regulations (Core)

In a decision of the NSW Industrial Court issued in March 2013, UNSW was found to have breached the Work, Health and Safety Act 2000 after a student suffered leg injuries and a broken wrist after falling from a boat while undertaking a research field trip on 31 July 2009. UNSW pleaded guilty and received a fine of $100,000. See WorkCover NSW report.

PR

Product Responsibility

 

PR2

Incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning health and safety impacts (Additional)

None

PR5

Practices related to customer satisfaction (Additional)

UNSW undertakes a regular graduate satisfaction survey of all UNSW graduates approximately four months after they complete the requirements for their awards. For more information see UNSW's Business Reporting and Intelligence, and Data Governance.

PR7

Incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning marketing communications

(Additional)

None

PR8

Substantiated complaints regarding breaches of customer privacy (Additional)

None

PR9

Significant fines for non-compliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and services (Core).

None

GRI Application Table

We believe this report qualifies for application level C of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) G3 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines. Details of the profile disclosures and performance indicators addressed in this report can be found in the table at Appendix A and on the UNSW Sustainability website.

 

Declarations and charters

The following are the major declarations and organisations that are endorsed by UNSW and call for universities to make a strong commitment to the implementation of sustainability.


Declarations and Charters

Organisation or Event

Main Goal

Agenda 21 (see Chapter 36 'Education,
Public Awareness and Training')

UNESCO

Set in place a range of activities to implement global sustainable development. Advocates a holistic approach to environmental education.

Australian Universities Ecological Development Charter

National Union of
Students
Provide a strong framework to guide
sustainability within Australian universities. Similar in content to the Talloires Declaration.
AVCC Policy on Education
for Sustainable Development

Universities Australia

Commit to education for sustainable
development and acknowledge the leading role played by universities in furthering the goals of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD).

Kyoto Declaration on
Sustainable Development

United Nations

Urge universities worldwide to seek, establish and disseminate a clearer understanding of sustainable development. It is recommended
that each university have its own action plan that makes an institutional commitment to the principle and practice of sustainable development.

Sapporo Sustainability
Declaration

G8 University Summit

Outline the responsibility of universities to contribute towards sustainability and the specific actions they must undertake to fulfil that responsibility. It recognises eight principles concerning the role of universities in global efforts to attain sustainability.

Talloires Declaration

University Leaders for
a Sustainable Future

Outlines a 10-point action plan for incorporating sustainability and environmental literacy in teaching, research, operations and outreach at 
colleges and universities.

The Greenhouse Challenge

Australian Greenhouse
Office

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from buildings, waste products and plant and office equipment.

United Nations Decade of
Education for Sustainable
Development (DESD)
2005-2015

UNESCOImplement environmental education globally, for everyone’s benefit, while working to build thecommunity’s capacity to co-create a sustainable
future.
Universitas 21 Statement
on Sustainability
Universitas 21 (U21)Member network of 20 research-led universities that benchmark against each other and commit to progressing global sustainable development in five areas:
  1. research towards sustainable futures
  2. education for sustainability
  3. universities as living laboratories for sustainability
  4. enhancing citizenship and engagement
  5. building capacity through cross-network collaboration and action. 
Sustainability Collaboration AgreementRandwick City CouncilEnables UNSW students to access internship and placement opportunities with Randwick Council and for the council to access a number of specialist sustainability activities underway across the University. It facilitates practical student learning and the application of particular areas of research and teaching into on-ground sustainability related projects or strategy areas being delivered through Council programs.

Acknowledgements

UNSW Sustainability would like to extend huge thanks to the following people who made the compilation of this report possible:

Dr Jose Bilbao
Robert Brown
Mark Clark
Amy Coopes
Carla Corradi
Ojasvi Chavali
Associate Professor Vinayak Dixit
Kate Dunn
Wendy Frew
Raymond Galway
Murray Green
William Hunter
Professor Ian Jacobs
Nicholas Jones
Denise Knight
Evelyn Kuldan
Associate Professor Pierre Le-Clech
Aaron Magner
Fiona Martin
Fiona MacDonald
Tony Maniaty
Stephen Moore
Clare Morgan
Estely Pruze
Janet Pursehouse
Professor Veena Sahajwalla
Arifa Sarfraz
Professor Nicholas Schofield
Dr Neeraj Sharma
Fran Strachan
Professor Ian Turner
Christopher Vanneste
Professor Travis Waller
Louise Williams

We would like to acknowledge Penny Jones for her work in seeking out and developing stories and interpreting research and data to support this year's report. We'd also like to extend special thanks to Ecocreative. Their strategic, design and communications services (and infographics) have greatly enhanced this sustainability report.

Additional thanks must go to commercial partners that helped provide data and supporting information, including Climate Friendly, Complete Office Supplies, Doyle Bros, Gastronomy and GoGet.